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Squeezing Out The Sexiness

October 17, 2011

The word ‘corset,’ was originally Middle English, from Anglo-French and its first usage was back in the 13th century. This word was drawn from the Old French word corps and the minute of body, which itself obtains from corpus – Latin for body. Corset was described as a tight-gripping undergarment that supports the middle trunk in order for either the emphasis or the concealment of the bosom, or to let the waist reach its smallest size, or it could also be used for both purposes. To provide the women with the desired hourglass-shaped body, the sides of corsets were intentionally made to have a ribbing that is curve-shaped.

Long before, the corset was used as a symbol of showing off an individual’s status in the society. The realization for the usage of this piece of garment was strongly implemented by Caterina de’ Medici (Italian name), who was an Italian noblewoman and Queen consort of France from 1547 until 1559, as the wife of King Henry II of France.

Corsets were considered to be one of the foundations of fashion for its purposes and designs have also evolved with time. These garments were meant to facilitate the women in order to enhance and possess the perfect contour of the body in the past. In present times, when corsets come into picture, they would be closely linked to provoking and naughty women’s underwear. Soon enough, the sexy style of sophistication it brought to fashion had finally sprung out and has continued to flourish ever since.

From its status-strained reflection to the tempting image it exudes, and now to its modernized classy elegance it profoundly radiates. Corsets are no longer used as an undergarment, but as a top piece of garb itself paired with leggings, jeans, dresses, and even shorts. Famous young actress, Emma Watson, is undeniably one of the risk takers in fashion who has given a new-fangled approach in sporting a corset.

         

Can you handle it?

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